Wooclap: a Digital Voting System

What is it?

Wooclap is a digital voting system supported by Ghent University that contains various options for creating (anonymous) interaction during synchronous and asynchronous teaching moments.

For example, the system contains the possibility to create an event consisting of different question types that you can use during, but also before or after a lesson, such as:

  • Multiple choice questions
  • Polls
  • Word cloud
  • Annotating images 
  • Open-ended questions

Furthermore, it includes the option to set up a message wall. Here, students can post questions (anonymously or not) during class in the form of a message and upvote each other's questions. During a question moment, you can open this message wall and sort and discuss the most popular questions.

Finally, it includes the option to set up questionnaires comprising different question types that students can complete at their own pace. This is ideal for asynchronous teaching moments or in a learning path.

Technical Manuals

  • Technical manual 
  • In order to make teachers discover Wooclap and to help them to take control of the tool, open training sessions are organized by the Wooclap team, in the form of online webinars. When training sessions are organized, you will be informed here. 
  • Watch this 6-minute instruction video to find out how to efficiently use Wooclap in your lectures.
  • Watch the recording of the training on Wooclap (see below)

Wooclap for Teaching Activities

What Are Suitable Didactic and/or Assessment Methods? 

Are you still unsure about which didactic method to use in your teaching practice? Find inspiration in this Education Tip

 

What do you need to know about Wooclap for your educational activity?

  • Choose one single polling tool to ask questions. If you choose Wooclap, do not use the polling tool in Zoom in that same lecture. This is more straightforward for both you and the students.
  • Use Wooclap if you teach in a hybrid classroom setting so that both the students at home and in the classroom have the opportunity to participate and vote.
  • Start with an icebreaker. Provide a first question at the start of the lesson. This both a warm welcome for the students who participate in the lesson and a technical check to make sure everyone is familiar with Wooclap.
  • Students can open the Wooclap website either on their computer or their smartphone to vote. They can also participate in a live vote via SMS, but we do not strongly recommend this. There is no specific smartphone app.
  • Wooclap can be integrated into your PowerPoint presentation (note: this only works in certain versions of PowerPoint. Use the online version of PowerPoint when it doesn't work in the desktop version. Click here for more information.) or you can upload your PowerPoint onto the tool and insert questions from an event. If you prefer the latter, do be aware that your animations will be removed from your PowerPoint presentation. 
  • You can either reset your event completely or per question. This allows you to reuse one event several times during your lecture without having to copy it, and thus generate a new code. You can always download and save the results of a past event in the form of an Excel file.
  • The question type ‘open question’ allows for students to send in self-made diagrams, calculations, and illustrations by taking a photo. As a result, you can go through these submitted answers randomly and thus actively use your students’ input in the lecture.
  • Use the message wall or the results from your different question types to quickly determine what remains unclear or unanswered by students. Check back on this asynchronously (via a discussion forum) or in a subsequent lecture.
  • Find out here which mathematical programs support Whooclap in for drafting your questions.
  • Take a look at the following Education Tip for more didactic tips about voting systems

Herbekijk de online sessie van 2 oktober 2020

In deze sessie worden alle functionaliteiten van wooclap behandeld.

UGent Practices

Last modified Oct. 12, 2021, 9:14 a.m.